BUILDING URBAN ECOSYSTEMS

Join us for the COP 26 ‘Rewilding Weekend’ and ‘Sessions on Nature-based Solutions’ at the Govan Wetlands!
Find out more and register below.

BLUE GREEN GLASGOW PROJECT

Blue Green Glasgow CIC is a community interest company restoring post-industrial land in Glasgow by building wetland, or blue-green, ecosystems for climate adaptation, engaging communities, and the creation of sustainable jobs.

The organisation is affiliated with the Blue Green Carbon programme, a platform for environmental restoration through carbon offset activities.

The organisation’s Govan Wetland Project sits in the heart of Glasgow, right across the river from COP26, and makes up a 5-acre wetland restoration site where coastal wetland ecosystems are being built to capture carbon, rehabilitate soils, and support wildlife. The site also features regenerative farming practices that put nature at the heart of food production.

COP 26 EVENTS

For the COP26 conference, the Blue Green Glasgow team are inviting delegates, policy shapers, and people from all over the world to come and experience climate adaptation first hand.

Multiple events will be held at the Govan Wetlands throughout the conference which will include a big planting weekend, documentaries around the development of the project, fireside chats with senior academics from Scottish Universities, presentations by international delegates on nature-based solutions, live music, and networking opportunities.

REWILDING WEEKENDS AT THE GOVAN WETLANDS

30th & 31st October – 11am to 4pm
6th & 7th November – 11am to 4pm
13th & 14th November – 11am to 4pm

FREE EVENT

NATURE-BASED SOLUTIONS CONFERENCE


5th November – 4 to 8pm
7th November – 2 to 6pm

11th November – 5 to 8pm

FREE EVENTS

REWILDING WEEKEND AT THE GOVAN WETLANDS

23rd & 24th October – 11am to 5pm

FREE EVENT

SO WHAT IS CARBON FARMING?

Carbon Farming is the process of combining the most carbon-retentive forms of conservation and environmental engineering and putting them all together in one place, creating a natural carbon sink that produces food without freshwater!

By selecting salt-tolerant plants from wetlands we can then create a natural habitat in the desert, or anywhere else, where these natural ecosystems tackle climate change threats like carbon emissions or desertification. 


AND WHY WETLANDS?

Well, wetlands are simply amazing ecosystems!

They take in over 30 times more carbon than the rainforest, protect our coasts from rising sea-levels, and are home to an amazing 40% of plant and animal species in the world!

In fact, over 1 billion humans directly depend on wetlands in some way through fishing, transport, or even tourism. However, wetlands are under threat, with nearly 70% having been destroyed to make room for farming or cities.

MEET THE TEAM

We are a highly ambitious team of scientists, environmentalists and development specialists looking for ever creative ways to restore wetlands around the world for climate resilience and food security.

We are based in Glasgow, Scotland, but you are more likely to find us at one of our carbon farms in Ghana, Bangladesh, Namibia or Vietnam.

Our mission is to restore our degraded coastlines and create a greener future for coastal communities at the front lines of climate change.

THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO MAKE THAT HAPPEN

With your support we will scale-up our operations so that they can be seen from space!

We are inviting you to join us as we launch the world’s most ambitious carbon farming ventures out there. We will green the desert in Namibia, plant a million mangroves in Ghana, and build back Bangladeshi saltmarshes.

You can do so by donating to support our blue carbon project, integrating our story into your marketing, and even collaborating with us on creating new products like sustainable clothing and climate-friendly food.

PARTNERS

Is biochar a solution to climate change?

Biochar is a stable form of carbon (similar to charcoal). For every tonne of biochar 3 tonnes of atmospheric C02 is captured and when sequestered in soils or building materials the carbon is permanently stored. As such “Biochar is one of the most promising near-term commercially viable carbon removal approaches.” The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine. Report: Negative Emissions Technologies and Reliable Sequestration 2019

“Biochar sequestration provides an additional route for terrestrial carbon storage.” IPCCReport published 8th October 2018  ‘Global Warming of 1.5oc.’

Which is also why biochar addresses 12 of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) and why the demand for the CO2 Removal Certificates (CORCS) has already outstripped global supply! 

What’s so special about biochar?

Industry and academia have been adapting / formatting biochar’s to a be applied to a huge variety of soils, crops, agroforestry, substrates applications for years. As such biochar is most generally viewed as soil improvement tool which can both sequester carbon and improve soil health by retaining nutrients and water.

More recently however new products are being developed for green infrastructure, water quality and construction materials. The physical, chemical and biological properties of biochar make it a versatile material which can be used in a variety of applications.

James MacPhail from Sequest Ltd: “The use of biochar as a Nature Based Solution has been fully international for many years; individuals, businesses and research organizations have been busy developing biochar products to meet the demands of agriculture/horticulture, reforestation and carbon markets”.

Why is biochar useful in soil remediation?

Biochar has been used to great effect for years on remediating soils that are contaminated with heavy metals such as cadmium, lead and zinc, dangerous chemicals, such as arsenic, pesticides and organic pollutants.

There have been a vast number of international scientific studies into the effect biochar has contaminated soils. Crucially once the sponge like structure of the biochar absorbs the pollutants these aren’t released again. The immobilisation of the contaminants though biochar can lock up 500 times more than soil alone – due to its high surface area, high cation exchange capacity and long residence time in the soil.

Biochar doesn’t reduce the total levels of heavy metals in soils, it reduces the bioavailability to plants and mobility in soils. Phytoremediation consists of growing plants which can actively take up heavy metals, these can be harvested to reduce the level of contaminants in the soil – therefore a combination of biochar addition and phytoremediation as a good option for polluted soils.


PRESS

Access the full press release by clicking the download button and share it on your media channels.

“Glasgow Company Builds Wetland Ecosystem Designed to Capture Carbon Across River Clyde from COP26 Venue”
BLUE GREEN GLASGOW

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GET IN TOUCH

If you would like to find out more, or to explore potential opportunities to join our mission, we would be delighted to hear from you.

Director: kenny@bluegreenglasgow.org

General: hello@bluegreenglasgow.org

Media: hannah@bluegreenglasgow.org

We look forward to hearing from you!